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Waveney Ann Moore, Times Staff Writer

Waveney Ann Moore

Waveney Ann Moore is a general assignment reporter for the Tampa Bay Times. She covers a wide range of topics in the metropolitan area, most recently the debate over the future of the St. Petersburg Pier.

She was a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for "For Their Own Good," about abuse at Florida's oldest reform school. The series won the Dart Award for covering trauma, the Casey Medal for exemplary reporting on children and families and first place for nondeadline reporting in the 2010 Green Eyeshade competition run by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Moore was also a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer as part of a team that covered the story of the Rev. Henry Lyons, former head of the National Baptist Convention U.S.A.

She's a former reporter for the Kansas City Star.

Born in Guyana, on the northern coast of South America, she is a naturalized American citizen.

Phone: (727) 892-2283

Email: wmoore@tampabay.com

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  1. Jordan Park to get $20 million makeover and new senior housing

    Real Estate

    By WAVENEY ANN MOORE

    Times Staff Writer

    ST. PETERSBURG —The St. Petersburg Housing Authority, which bought back the troubled Jordan Park public housing complex this year, plans to spend about $20 million to improve the 237-unit property and construct a new three-story building for seniors.

    For the 31 families in a section of the complex known as the Historic Village, the plans will bring major change. The one-story, craftsman-style buildings in which they live are to be demolished to make way for the new housing. Residents have already received vouchers to move, but some hope to return when the new senior apartments are built....

    Sharlene Gambell-Davis, 63, walks from her home at the Jordan Park Historic Village, 10/16/17. The St. Petersburg Housing Authority, which bought back the troubled Jordan Park public housing complex earlier this year, plans to spend about $20 million to improve the 237-unit property and build a new three-story building for seniors. The residents in the Historic Village will have to move, since that section of the complex will be demolished. [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
  2. Bahá'i faith celebrates 200th anniversary of birth of divine messenger Bahá'u'lláh

    Religion

    Times Staff Writer

    ST. PETERSBURG — Farah Khorsandian-Sanchez was born to Iranian parents in India, in a Bahá'í home. Her husband was born in Spain, grew up in Venezuela and is Catholic.

    As a Bahá'í, Khorsandian-Sanchez doesn't focus on differences — not of country, ethnicity, race, economic status or beliefs. She embraces her faith's teachings, which profess to the "oneness of humankind," gender equality, eradication of prejudice and pursuit of world peace....

    Some of the prayer books that are used at the St. Petersburg Baha'i Center in St. Petersburg on Saturday. A group on Saturday gathered to study the teachings of the Baha'i faith. EVE EDELHEIT   |   Times
  3. District 6 Council candidate Justin Bean crisscrosses St. Petersburg

    Blog

    ST. PETERSBURG – City Council District 6 candidate Justin Bean spent Thursday crisscrossing the city by bus, electric car and bike as part of a campaign to get his message out.
    His final stop was City Hall, where he spoke on the steps of the historic municipal building about what he referred to as the most pressing issues facing St. Petersburg, among them economic development, the lack of a grocery store in Midtown, affordable housing, early childhood education and the redevelopment of Tropicana Field.
    "What a lot of people don't know is that site used to be a neighborhood," he said, referring to the displacement of a number of residents in the city's African-American community to make way for the stadium.
    Any redevelopment must include healing "that wound," he said.
    One of Bean's stops was Tangerine Plaza in Midtown, where two supermarkets have failed.
    "We need to make sure that we have resources for everyone in the city, not just people in downtown and that includes a grocery store," he said in front of City Hall, vowing to make it a top priority if elected.
    Bean, 30, a business development sales manager for his family's downtown firm, Reusable Transport Packaging, is making his first run for office.
    "My message is I want to create a St. Petersburg that works for everyone," he said by telephone during a pause for lunch at the Chattaway restaurant in the Old Southeast neighborhood. "We are going to try to see all of St. Petersburg, so we are traveling from north to south and then west to east talking about different components of my platform and plan."
    His first stop was at Jabil, at 10560 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. St. N, to emphasize economic development.
    "The primary focus would be to help the small companies and the growing businesses...as well as recruit established businesses here," he said. "We used Jabil as an example of a large employer."
    Bean said he plans to work with Enterprise Florida and the new St. Petersburg Economic Development Corporation to  achieve his goals.
    His journey also took him in front of Melrose Elementary School. That was to emphasize education, he said, especially apprenticeships and improving the quality and access to early childhood education.
     "I believe that education is the great equalizer and in order to create a St. Petersburg that works for everyone, we need to improve our education," he said.
    Bean's most recent endorsements have come from the St. Petersburg Association of Firefighters Local 747, the Suncoast Police Benevolent Association and the Pinellas Realtor Organization.
    Gina Driscoll, 46, president of the Downtown Neighborhood Association and a sales manager for the Hampton Inn and Suites downtown, is Bean's rival for the District 6 seat.
    She said she is focused "on making our neighborhoods stronger and working on the specific issues" that affect residents' quality of life.
    "When I'm out talking with people from different neighborhoods throughout the city, their biggest concerns are those things that are happening right outside their front door," she said by phone Thursday. 
    "As I'm listening to people, they have concerns about our infrastructure, not just our sewage system, but our sidewalks and bridges. They are concerned about affordability and that's whether I'm talking to a resident who is renting a home and hoping to buy their first home, or a small business owner concerned about the retail space they rent."
    She added that by working on those issues and making neighborhoods stronger, the entire city will be stronger.
    Driscoll's latest endorsements have come from Pinellas County Commissioner Ken Welch, School Board member Rene Flowers and City Council Vice Chair Lisa Wheeler-Bowman.
    District 6 includes downtown and parts of the Old Northeast, Midtown, Historic Uptown and the Old Southeast.
    Contact Waveney Ann Moore at wmoore@tampabay.com or (727) 892-2283. Follow @wmooretimes....

    District 6 St. Petersburg City Council candidate Justin Bean speaks in front of City Hall on Thursday.
  4. International array of artists chosen as finalists for pier project

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — A diverse group of six artists will compete for a chance to install their work at the city's multimillion-dollar Pier District, expected to open in early 2019.

    Wednesday a committee appointed by the city's Public Arts Commission pared a list of 13 artists from the United States and Europe to six finalists. The committee also selected two alternates.

    Making the cut were Xenobia Bailey, an African-American artist known for her work with fiber and mosaics; Jun Kaneko, who was born in Nagoya, Japan, in 1942 and has his studio in Nebraska; Ned Kahn, Nathan Mabry and the Ball-Nogues Studio are all from California; Jeppe Hein is based in Europe....

  5. To help Jordan Park's seniors, 31 families must find new homes

    Real Estate

    ST. PETERSBURG —The St. Petersburg Housing Authority, which bought back the troubled Jordan Park public housing complex earlier this year, plans to spend about $20 million to improve the 237-unit property and build a new three-story building for seniors.

    But that means 31 families will have to find new housing.

    Their section of the complex, one-story Craftsman-style buildings in what is known as the Historic Village, will be demolished to make way for the new structure....

    Jordan Park, the historic public housing complex, is back in the hands of the St. Petersburg Housing Authority. The agency is working to improve the 237-unit complex. But the latest plan to build a new three-story building for seniors will mean 31 families have to find new homes. [LARA CERRI   |   Tampa Bay Times]
  6. So far, Echelman sculpture soars above St. Pete's election drama

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — In this year's pugnacious mayoral campaign, seemingly everything has become a campaign issue: a lack of grocery stores in the city's poorest neighborhoods, restoring power after Hurricane Irma, the sewage system and the cost of the pier.

    But there's one aspect of the long-running pier project that has somehow escaped that fate: Janet Echelman's proposed seven-figure aerial sculpture....

    Artist Janet Echelman is trying to bring one of her famed aerial sculptures to St. Petersburg’s new Pier District.
  7. Know Your City Council Candidates: Justin Bean vs. Gina Driscoll, District6

    Elections

    Justin Bean and Gina Driscoll, the top two candidates from the Aug. 29 primary that drew eight hopefuls, are vying to replace City Council member Karl Nurse, who is term-limited. District 6 includes parts of downtown, the Old Northeast, Midtown, Historic Uptown and the Old Southeast.

    About the job: City Council members serve four-year terms and earn $44,452 annually.

    Justin Bean

    ...

    St. Petersburg City Council candidates Justin Bean (left) and Gina Driscoll are running against each other for the District 6 seat. This is a combination image made from two separate photos. [SCOTT KEELER  |   Times]
  8. St. Pete District 6: Bean, Driscoll announce endorsements

    Blog

    ST. PETERSBURG – The two candidates vying for the City Council District 6 seat are both touting endorsements.

    The campaign of Justin Bean announced Wednesday that the Suncoast Police Benevolent Association has endorsed the 30-year-old business development sales manager.

    St. Petersburg District 6 City Council race: Justin Bean vs. Gina Driscoll...

    Left to Right: St. Petersburg City Council Candidates, District 6, Gina Driscoll and Justin Bean, share a laugh in the parking lot of the Coliseum Ballroom, 8/29/17 on election day as they greeted voters.
  9. St. Pete District 6 council race: Justin Bean vs. Gina Driscoll

    Elections

    ST. PETERSBURG — Now that they've come out on top in an eight-candidate primary, Justin Bean and Gina Driscoll are taking their battle for the City Council District 6 seat citywide.

    Each touts their service to the city:

    Bean, 30, a business development sales manager for his family's downtown firm, Resuable Transport Packaging, touts his role in helping to make Williams Park safer and more welcoming, his past leadership of St. Pete Young Professionals and his service on a pier committee that helped set the plans for its $20 million approach. He also was appointed to the Mayor's Complete Streets Committee and worked as a consultant on a proposal to redevelop the Tropicana Field site....

    The candidates for the District 6 City Council seat (from left) Justin Bean and Gina Driscoll, appear at a candidate forum at City Hall. [CHERIE DIEZ   |   Times]
  10. St.Pete City Council candidate Justin Bean addresses past arrest

    Blog

    ST. PETERSBURG — Justin Bean topped the crowded field of City Council District 6 hopefuls in the Aug. 29 primary.

    He also snagged the endorsements of former City Council member and chair Bill Dudley, as well as Pinellas County Commissioner John Morroni. Additionally, the Tampa Bay Times recommended him for the seat.

    But now the 30-year-old candidate finds himself answering questions about his past. A previously undisclosed 2010 run-in with the law was reported by tampabaybeat.info on Sept. 26....

    Justin Bean, District 6 City Council candidate, addresses a 2010 misdemeanor that has become a campaign issue
  11. Council hopefuls weigh in on issues

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The six candidates for City Council gathered Monday evening in the very chamber to which they aspire to serve.

    The candidates for Districts 2, 4 and 6 gathered at City Hall for a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters. They fielded a wide range of questions from the audience that had been vetted by the organization.

    Hot-button topics included the future of the Tampa Bay Rays, the new pier, the state of St. Petersburg's infrastructure and economic development. There were also questions about what candidates thought about climate change, how they would lift up Midtown — the economically depressed, mostly African-American area in District 6 — and whether they support the city's annual Pride celebration. They were also asked about caring for the mentally ill and homeless, about public transportation and hurricane preparedness....

    Darden Rice
  12. No lack of issues facing St. Petersburg's six council candidates

    Elections

    ST. PETERSBURG — The six candidates for City Council gathered Monday evening in the very chamber to which they aspire to serve.

    The candidates for Districts 2, 4 and 6 gathered at City Hall for a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters. They fielded a wide range of questions from the audience that had been vetted by the organization.

    SUNSHINE CITY SHOWDOWN: Keep up with the Tampa Bay Times coverage of the St. Petersburg mayoral race....

    St. Petersburg City Council candidates (from left) Jerick Johnston and incumbent council member Darden Rice. Johnston, a political newcomer, is challenging Rice for the District 4 seat.  They appeared at Monday night's forum at City Hall sponsored by the League of Women Voters. [CHERIE DIEZ   |   Times]
  13. Pinellas grants St. Pete's request to add millions to pier budget

    Local Government

    Times Staff Writer

    The Pinellas County Commission has granted St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman's request to dedicate millions more toward the city's new pier.

    The commission's vote raises the budget for the 26-acre Pier District to $76 million.

    St. Petersburg officials had asked the county commission to approve reallocating $14 million in tax increment financing, or TIF funds — once meant to build a mixed-use transportation facility for the city — to the pier project and to improve transportation and parking options in downtown....

    The St. Petersburg City Council on Thursday  voted 7-1 to appropriate $17.6 million for the over-water portion of the Pier District. This is a rendering of what the new Pier District could look like. [Courtesy of St. Petersburg]
  14. City council candidates talk on Rays, solar and sea-level rise

    Blog

    Candidates for three City Council seats took questions from a polite crowd Wednesday night during a forum organized by the Council of Neighborhood Associations.

    Residents asked about prominent issues like the Tampa Bay Rays’ quest for a stadium and the cost of the pier, but they also wanted to know the candidates’ positions on banning plastic bags, solar panels, sea-level rise, historic preservation and improvements away from downtown....

    City Hall
  15. At Menorah Manor, planning paid off during Irma

    Nursing Homes

    ST. PETERSBURG — Doris Rosenblatt and her husband, Frank, have lived in Florida all of their lives, so they know about hurricanes.

    Back in 1985, they evacuated from their Madeira Beach condo to Davis Islands and then to a sturdy, family-owned warehouse to take shelter from Hurricane Elena. When Irma threatened this year, they were unfazed.

    HURRICANE IRMA: Read the latest coverage from the Tampa Bay Times....

    Menorah Manor director of dietary services, Michael Soronen (left), with CEO Rob Goldstein next to pallets of food, water and cleaning supplies going to two independent senior communities after Hurricane Irma. To help keep its patients safe during the storm, Menorah Manor allowed employees to shelter their families and pets at the nursing home and also offered daycare. The facility was able to accommodate and feed everyone who weathered the storm there. [Courtesy of Menorah Manor]