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Going green

  1. Massive crocodile seen roaming the streets, and there was only 1 thing a cop could do

    Wildlife

    Name one thing you really don't want to see around 4 a.m. walking around your neighborhood.

    Watch out for that croc.

    A crocodile was seen roaming a street in Miami-Dade.
  2. Pinellas County embarks on $19-million project to pull muck out of Lake Seminole

    Environment

    SEMINOLE — Environmental experts, always concerned about the water quality of Lake Seminole, are assessing how much Hurricane Irma may have stirred up the nearly 1 million cubic yards of muck that lay on the bottom.

    Despite the expenditure of more than $30 million over nearly two decades, improved water quality in Lake Seminole remains elusive. The muck that lines the bottom of the 684-acre freshwater lake keeps accumulating while the cost to remove it keeps rising. Having exhausted less drastic methods for restoring the lake, the county is about to embark on a six-year dredging project expected to cost $18.6 million. DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD  |  Times

  3. Memorial for Snooty the manatee, postponed because of Irma, to be held Sunday

    Wildlife

    A public memorial to celebrate the life of 69-year-old Snooty the manatee will be held at the South Florida Museum on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.

    Snooty , the world's most celebrated manatee, begs for another slice of apple in his pool in the Parker Manatee Aquarium at the South Florida Museum in Bradenton in 2008. Snooty was 60 then. [Times 2008]
  4. Study: Dispersant used to clean 2010 BP oil spill harmed humans

    Water

    A first-of-its-kind scientific study has determined that the dispersant BP sprayed at the oil gushing from the Deepwater Horizon rig in 2010 harmed human health.

    This image from a 2010 video provided by BP shows dispersant, white plume at center, being applied to an oil leak at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil well in the Gulf of Mexico. A first-of-its-kind scientific study has determined that the dispersant BP used to clean-up the oil spill harmed human health. (AP Photo/BP PLC)
  5. How visiting a scenic Cuban resort can help save green sea turtles

    Wildlife

    The Florida Aquarium has been collaborating with Cuba's National Aquarium since 2015 to help save coral dying throughout Caribbean waters.

    The beaches of Cuba's Cayo Largo are home to a large population of green sea turtle nests. The Florida Aquarium will lead eco-tours of Cayo Largo next year that will help protect the turtles and fund research.  [Avalon Outdoor]
  6. Irma roughs up endangered snail kites, birds that help us gauge the Everglades' health

    Wildlife

    Hurricane Irma was as rough on some wildlife as it was on the humans. Audubon of Florida reported Thursday that the storm destroyed all 44 nests around Lake Okeechobee built by the endangered Everglades snail kite, a bird considered crucial to the River of Grass ecosystem.

    Hurricane Irma destroyed 44 snail kite nests, capping off a poor mating season for the endangered species, which is seen as an important barometer of the health of the Florida Everglades. Their off-center beaks allow them to probe inside the spiral shells of the native apple snails. But the snails' population has dropped as the Everglades has changed. [MAC STONE | Audubon of Florida]
  7. League of Women Voters sustainability summit now set for Saturday

    Environment

    ST. PETERSBURG — A sustainability summit delayed by Hurricane Irma has been rescheduled for Saturday.

  8. A 50-year effort to raise endangered whooping cranes comes to an end

    Wildlife

    Each spring for 12 years, Paula Wang began a temporary position at a government lab in a suburb north of Washington. She was required to remain silent while working and to wear a white suit and hood. The mission was not top-secret, but Wang felt it was urgent all the same: To save an endangered species.

    Volunteer Paula Wang feeds a whooping crane chick at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. A stuffed "adult" rests in the background. [Courtesy of Paula Wang]
  9. Irma's winds blew thousands of baby squirrels from trees, now these Tampa Bay groups are trying to save them

    Wildlife

    Nancy Murrah walked into her yard in Brandon the morning after Hurricane Irma passed over Tampa Bay and saw fallen tree limbs tangled and piled on top of each other. As a wild animal rescuer, she had one thought:

    Rescue groups across Tampa Bay are caring for more than 300 baby squirrels after Hurricane Irma's winds threw them from their nests. (Suncoast Animal League)
  10. As Irma nears Florida, concern for animals a major issue

    Environment

    MIAMI — The evacuation took 12 seconds.

    Flamingos at Zoo Miami are shown in a temporary enclosure in a hurricane resistant structure within the zoo Saturday. Most animals will remain in their secure structures, and their instincts will help them ride out the storm.