Wednesday, November 22, 2017
Cooking

Five pie recipes to make for Thanksgiving, or any time of year

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You’ve got the crust down. Now it’s time to choose a filling for your holiday pie. Try one of these five recipes, which range from classic to unexpected.

 

 

Classic Apple Pie

Pie dough, homemade or storebought, enough for 2 (9-inch) pies

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 ½ pounds apples, peeled and cored, then cut into wedges (5 large honeycrisps will do it)

¼ teaspoon ground allspice

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¾ cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons cornstarch

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

1 egg, lightly beaten

Roll out half of the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 12-inch round, rotating often and dusting with more flour as needed to prevent sticking. Transfer to a 9-inch pie dish. Lift up edges and allow dough to slump down into dish. You should have about 1-inch overhang. Fold edges under and crimp. Freeze 15 minutes.

Melt butter in a large saute pan set over medium-high heat and add apples to the pan. Stir to coat fruit with butter and cook, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, whisk together the spices, salt and
¾ cup sugar, and sprinkle this over the pan, stirring to combine. Lower heat and cook until apples have started to soften, approximately 5 to 7 minutes. Sprinkle the flour and cornstarch over the apples and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, another 3 to 5 minutes. Remove pan from heat, add cider vinegar, stir and scrape fruit mixture into a bowl and allow to cool completely.

Place a large baking sheet on the middle rack of oven and heat to 425 degrees.

Remove pie crust from freezer and put the cooled filling into it.

Roll out the remaining dough on a lightly floured surface until it is roughly 10 or 11 inches in diameter and use to make a decorative top. Add this layer to the pie and press the edges together. Lightly brush the top of the pie with egg wash and sprinkle with remaining tablespoon of sugar.

Place pie in oven and bake on hot baking sheet for 20 minutes, then reduce temperature to 375 degrees. Continue to cook until the interior is bubbling and the crust is golden brown, about 30 to 40 minutes more. Remove and allow to cool on a windowsill or kitchen rack, about two hours.

Source: New York Times

 

Maple Sugar Pie

Pie dough, homemade or storebought, enough for 2 (9-inch) pies

2 cups (packed) light brown sugar

1 cup heavy cream

½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter

1 tablespoon whiskey

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

5 large eggs, room temperature

1 cup all-purpose flour

¾ teaspoon kosher salt

Whipped cream (for serving)

Roll out half of the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 12-inch round, rotating often and dusting with more flour as needed to prevent sticking. Transfer to a 9-inch pie dish. Lift up edges and allow dough to slump down into dish. You should have about 1-inch overhang. Fold edges under and crimp. Freeze 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat oven to 425 degrees. Lightly coat a sheet of foil with nonstick spray and place in pie crust, coated side down, pressing into bottom and up sides. Fill with pie weights and bake until edges of crust are pale golden, 15 to 20 minutes. Carefully remove foil and weights and continue to bake crust until bottom is golden and looks dry, 12 to 18 minutes more. Transfer dish to a wire rack and let crust cool.

Heat oven to 325 degrees. Heat brown sugar, cream and butter in a large heatproof bowl set over a large saucepan of barely simmering water, stirring constantly, until butter is melted, sugar is dissolved, and mixture is smooth (do not let bowl touch water). Remove bowl from heat and stir in whiskey and vanilla. Whisking constantly, add eggs one at a time, incorporating completely after each addition. Add flour and salt and whisk just until smooth. Scrape filling into crust and place on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet.

Roll out the remaining dough on a lightly floured surface until it is roughly 10 or 11 inches in diameter and use to make a decorative top.

Bake pie until filling is browned all over, puffed around the edges, and still slightly wobbly in the center, 45 to 55 minutes. Transfer dish to a wire rack and let pie cool at least 4 hours before slicing (the longer you can wait, the easier it’ll be to slice; do not refrigerate).

Source: Bon Appétit

 

Salted Caramel and Pecan Chocolate Pie

12 graham crackers

½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

1 cup bittersweet chocolate chips

3 cups toasted pecans

1 cup granulated sugar

2 tablespoons light corn syrup

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

½ teaspoon kosher salt

¾ cups heavy cream

Coarse sea salt, for serving

In a food processor, pulse graham crackers and coconut to form fine crumbs. Add butter and pulse to combine. Transfer to a 9-inch pie dish and press evenly on the bottom and up the sides. Scatter chocolate chips over the crust, then pecans, and refrigerate until firm, at least 20 minutes.

Transfer pie to a large rimmed baking sheet. Heat oven to 350 degrees.

Add sugar, corn syrup, and ¼ cup water to a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan. Cook over medium-high heat, without stirring, until bubbles start to form at the edges, about 1 minute; give the pan a swirl. Bring to a simmer, then increase heat to high and boil, swirling the pan occasionally until the mixture is a rich caramel color. Immediately remove from the heat, add butter and salt, and swirl the pan to melt.

Return the pan to medium heat, add cream (it will bubble up), and whisk until smooth, slightly thickened, and a deep amber color, about 1 minute.

Pour caramel over pecans, transfer pie to the oven, and bake until mixture is gently bubbling, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool. Sprinkle with coarse sea salt, if desired.

Source: Woman’s Day

 

Plug and Fig Thyme Pie

Pie dough, homemade or storebought, enough for 2 (9-inch) pies

2 pounds plums, pitted, ½-inch slices

½ pound fresh figs, quartered

½ tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

1 cup granulated sugar

¼ cup cornstarch

Pinch of salt

Roll out half of the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 12-inch round, rotating often and dusting with more flour as needed to prevent sticking. Transfer to a 9-inch pie dish. Lift up edges and allow dough to slump down into dish. You should have about 1-inch overhang. Fold edges under and crimp. Freeze 15 minutes.

Heat oven to 425 degrees.

Rinse the plums and the figs and remove any stems. Cut the plums into ½-inch slices. Keep the skin on the plums so that the plum slices retain their shape and to prevent the plums from becoming applesauce-like in consistency.

Remove the stems/firmer ends of the figs and cut into quarters.

In a large bowl combine the plum slices, figs, and thyme leaves. Add the granulated sugar, cornstarch and salt. Mix to combine well. Allow the mixture to rest for 10 minutes.

Pour mixture into prepared pie crust. Roll out the remaining dough on a lightly floured surface until it is roughly 10 or 11 inches in diameter and use to make a decorative top.

Place pie on a baking sheet and bake for about 20 to 30 minutes. Turn the temperature down to 375 degrees and bake for an additional 20 to 30 minutes or until golden brown. If the top begins to brown too quickly, cover with foil.

Source: Adapted from constellationinspiration.com

 

Buttermilk Lemon Pie

Pie dough, homemade or storebought, enough for 2 (9-inch) pies

1 ½ cups sugar

½ cup light brown sugar

1 ½ tablespoons yellow cornmeal

1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

5 large eggs, beaten to blend

2/3 cup buttermilk

½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted

1 ¾ tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 tablespoon freshly grated lemon zest

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Pinch of kosher salt

Roll out half of the dough on a lightly floured surface to a 12-inch round, rotating often and dusting with more flour as needed to prevent sticking. Transfer to a 9-inch pie dish. Lift up edges and allow dough to slump down into dish. You should have about 1-inch overhang. Fold edges under and crimp. Freeze 15 minutes.

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Remove pie crust from freezer. Line with parchment paper or foil; fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake crust until edges begin to brown, 30 to 35 minutes. Remove paper and weights; bake until golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes longer. Let cool completely.

Meanwhile, whisk sugar, brown sugar, cornmeal and flour in a medium bowl until well combined. Whisk eggs and remaining ingredients in a large bowl (mixture may look curdled). Slowly whisk in dry ingredients. Pour filling into a cooled crust and bake until custard is set around edges but jiggles slightly in center, 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack.

Source: Bon Appétit

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