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Trump, black caucus agree on aid for churches

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump and black Democratic lawmakers don't agree on much, but they do agree that FEMA needs to fund houses of worship that assist hurricane victims of hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

As the waters slowly recede from Houston and parts of Florida from the two deadly storms, the president and some members of the Congressional Black Caucus are aggressively diving into the murky waters of separation of church and state issues.

They separately argue that Federal Emergency Management Agency should make relief funds available to houses of worship, especially if those institutions are involved in helping victims of disasters.

"They give churches so much red tape to go through to get public benefits," Cedric Richmond, D-La., black caucus chairman, said of FEMA.

Houses of worship can get financial disaster assistance if their facilities are primarily used for "educational, utility, emergency, medical … custodial or essential services of a governmental nature," according to FEMA guidelines.

Trump jumped into the church-state debate Friday when he tweeted that three small Texas churches that were damaged by Hurricane Harvey should be entitled to FEMA assistance to help rebuild. The churches filed a lawsuit in federal District Court against FEMA seeking help.

FEMA officials were not made available for comment Wednesday.

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, who represents Houston, said black lawmakers "will be right here to work with the White House" on behalf of houses of worship.

That's not likely to happen soon. Relations have been tense between Trump and the black caucus. The caucus met with the president in January, but has had no meetings since.

The group rejected an invitation for a caucus meeting with the president in June, questioning Trump's sincerity about helping black Americans.

Now, though, he and other black caucus members are making arguments that Trump is also offering. Caucus members said FEMA's criteria for houses of worship is short-sighted, noting that religious facilities are often pressed into service during disasters to house and feed victims or even to serve as FEMA staging areas.

One of the churches in the Texas lawsuit, the Hi-Way Tabernacle, became a FEMA staging area, sheltered 70 people and sent out more than 8,000 emergency meals, the Washington Post reported.

In his tweet Friday, Trump wrote: "Churches in Texas should be entitled to reimbursement from FEMA Relief Funds for helping victims of Hurricane Harvey (just like others)."

Trump visiting Naples today

The Naples area, which was hit hard by Hurricane Irma on Sunday, will be the location of President Donald Trump's visit to Florida today. The president is expected to be joined by first lady Melania Trump. President Trump recently made two trips to Texas in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

Associated Press

Trump, black caucus agree on aid for churches 09/13/17 [Last modified: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 11:59pm]
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